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How Processing Delays Have People Out of Work During a Nationwide Labor Shortage

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Dayana Vera de Aponte had locked in her holiday plans after nearly two years of uncertainty fueled by the coronavirus pandemic, but then the unexpected happened: She lost her job because of an unprecedented U.S. government backlog.Vera de Aponte, a registered behavior technician for special needs children in Florida, had to walk away from her job this month when the work permit that allows her to legally work in the United States lapsed. Her family has since adjusted their holiday plans, including no longer flying in her husband’s mother, over financial concerns.”I had to talk to my daughter about the situation. … It’s not in my hands. It’s frustrating, and how do I explain that to her? I can’t buy her Christmas gifts because I’m afraid to spend money,” Vera de Aponte, who’s seeking political asylum in the U.S., told CNN in Spanish.Vera de Aponte is one of thousands of immigrants who have lost their jobs — or are on the cusp of losing them — due to bureaucratic delays. U.S. companies already reeling from a worker shortage are now facing the challenge of employees falling out of jobs because their work permits haven’t been renewed on time by the federal government.An IT company lost five employees this year because their permission to work hadn’t been renewed, leaving them unable to legally work in the United States, according to Leon Fresco, an immigration attorney representing the company. The business, which has roughly 1,000 employees, declined to be named over privacy concerns.While three of those employees have since obtained their renewals, the incident is emblematic of an issue dogging companies nationwide. “There are huge concerns just generally out there that this is going to keep happening,” Fresco said.Related video above: Federal vaccine mandate for health care workers causes staffing concernsThe limited supply of workers has already hampered U.S. companies and it’s at risk of being exacerbated by immigrants unable to keep jobs because they can’t legally work until their permits are renewed. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which adjudicates and approves work permits, says there’s an unprecedented backlog of 1.4 million work permit applications pending, including initial applications and renewals.USCIS didn’t have a breakdown of how many of those permits have lapsed because of the backlog, but an agency official told CNN they’ve been hearing from those affected about the problem.”We’re hearing from companies. We’re hearing from non-profits. We’re hearing from hospitals. And we’re hearing directly from the individuals affected,” the official said. “We’re very aware of the problem from all the way to the top of the agency and the department.”Some immigrants, including asylum seekers, are allowed to work in the U.S. while their cases are pending — a process that often takes years to complete — and they’re required to renew those permits on a regular basis.But without those renewals granted, work permits are lapsing, leaving employers no choice but to terminate workers even during a worker shortage.”The severity of the labor shortage is unprecedented,” said Gad Levanon, vice president of labor markets at The Conference Board, a business membership think tank. “When the labor shortage is so severe, any additional factor that is pulling away people from the labor market is more noticeable.”The National Association of Business Economics found that nearly half (47%) of respondents to its recent Business Conditions Survey reported a shortage of skilled workers in the third quarter, up from 32% reporting shortages in the second quarter of the year.”If the labor market was normal, then it would be easier for these companies to replace the ones that lost a work permit,” Levanon added. “Now, finding a qualified worker to replace is much more difficult.”The months-long delays in renewing work permits has been “disruptive” for companies, said Jon Baselice, vice president of immigration policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, who has frequently heard from companies concerned about processing issues.”It’s been quite disruptive,” he said. “You’re talking about a situation where a company can’t retain an employee at least in the short term because of lack of paperwork.”For those employees, the wait for what’s otherwise routine paperwork means putting off plans and fretting over family finances. Abelardo Rios, a telecommunications field technician residing in Florida, was suspended from his job last week. Rios, who’s seeking political asylum in the U.S., submitted his application for a renewal in February, three months before his work permit expired. He’s still waiting.”We don’t have any benefits, no medical insurance. They put the position on hold, but my family doesn’t have benefits right now,” Rios told CNN in Spanish.One of the most frustrating parts of the ordeal for Rios, who is the sole provider for his wife and 17-year-old daughter, is that he doesn’t have the option to find another job. He can’t work until his renewal request is granted, as it’s been many times before.In recent weeks, the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project has received hundreds of inquiries from people who say their work permits have expired or are on the cusp of expiring, according to Leidy Perez-Davis, policy director at the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project. They include doctors and specialists who attended to patients at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, engineers and long-haul truck drivers, among others.The Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project, along with the American Immigration Council and Lakin & Wille LLP, filed a lawsuit this month challenging the “unreasonable delays” in renewing work authorizations for asylum seekers. Vera de Aponte is a named plaintiff in the ASAP lawsuit.A work permit for an asylum seeker is usually valid for two years. Applicants can apply for renewal while their asylum application is pending. If they file before the permit expires, they can receive an automatic 180-day extension of their current permit. But processing, in some cases, is extending beyond that time frame, leaving asylum seekers in limbo.USCIS, an agency within the Department of Homeland Security, has been facing enormous backlogs across the board due to the coronavirus pandemic and, an official argued, poor management under the previous administration that in part resulted in a million cases spanning categories that were unopened in January.Since then, the Biden administration has been chipping away at the various backlogs at USCIS through policy changes, paying overtime, and trying to bring on more personnel, the official said. But while USCIS is trying to streamline operations to resolve for delays, it’s also doing so at a time when the agency is working to provide work permits to tens of thousands of Afghan evacuees, stressing already overwhelmed resources.”We are very focused on the human consequences of people losing their ability to work when that’s something they have no legal reason why they shouldn’t be eligible, and so that’s why we are focused on fixing it,” the official said.Heghine Muradyan, a doctor in California who attended to hundreds of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, lost her job in October when her work permit didn’t come in on time. It was approved this week, but she’s still waiting for the permit to get back to work. Muradyan, an asylum seeker who’s also a named plaintiff in the ASAP lawsuit, spent the last several weeks worried she’d lose her license to practice medicine if she didn’t return to work soon.The uncertainty of what comes next still looms over others.Biraj Nepal, a software engineer, gets a frequent warning from human resources that his work permit will expire in January, a reminder that he’s on the cusp of losing his job.”We feel this country is our home,” said Nepal, who has a 4-year-old daughter and a baby on the way. “But we’re living in constant fear and worries because we don’t know what will happen to us tomorrow.”

Dayana Vera de Aponte had locked in her holiday plans after nearly two years of uncertainty fueled by the coronavirus pandemic, but then the unexpected happened: She lost her job because of an unprecedented U.S. government backlog.

Vera de Aponte, a registered behavior technician for special needs children in Florida, had to walk away from her job this month when the work permit that allows her to legally work in the United States lapsed. Her family has since adjusted their holiday plans, including no longer flying in her husband’s mother, over financial concerns.

“I had to talk to my daughter about the situation. … It’s not in my hands. It’s frustrating, and how do I explain that to her? I can’t buy her Christmas gifts because I’m afraid to spend money,” Vera de Aponte, who’s seeking political asylum in the U.S., told CNN in Spanish.

Vera de Aponte is one of thousands of immigrants who have lost their jobs — or are on the cusp of losing them — due to bureaucratic delays. U.S. companies already reeling from a worker shortage are now facing the challenge of employees falling out of jobs because their work permits haven’t been renewed on time by the federal government.

An IT company lost five employees this year because their permission to work hadn’t been renewed, leaving them unable to legally work in the United States, according to Leon Fresco, an immigration attorney representing the company. The business, which has roughly 1,000 employees, declined to be named over privacy concerns.

While three of those employees have since obtained their renewals, the incident is emblematic of an issue dogging companies nationwide. “There are huge concerns just generally out there that this is going to keep happening,” Fresco said.

Related video above: Federal vaccine mandate for health care workers causes staffing concerns

The limited supply of workers has already hampered U.S. companies and it’s at risk of being exacerbated by immigrants unable to keep jobs because they can’t legally work until their permits are renewed. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which adjudicates and approves work permits, says there’s an unprecedented backlog of 1.4 million work permit applications pending, including initial applications and renewals.

USCIS didn’t have a breakdown of how many of those permits have lapsed because of the backlog, but an agency official told CNN they’ve been hearing from those affected about the problem.

“We’re hearing from companies. We’re hearing from non-profits. We’re hearing from hospitals. And we’re hearing directly from the individuals affected,” the official said. “We’re very aware of the problem from all the way to the top of the agency and the department.”

Some immigrants, including asylum seekers, are allowed to work in the U.S. while their cases are pending — a process that often takes years to complete — and they’re required to renew those permits on a regular basis.

But without those renewals granted, work permits are lapsing, leaving employers no choice but to terminate workers even during a worker shortage.

“The severity of the labor shortage is unprecedented,” said Gad Levanon, vice president of labor markets at The Conference Board, a business membership think tank. “When the labor shortage is so severe, any additional factor that is pulling away people from the labor market is more noticeable.”

The National Association of Business Economics found that nearly half (47%) of respondents to its recent Business Conditions Survey reported a shortage of skilled workers in the third quarter, up from 32% reporting shortages in the second quarter of the year.

“If the labor market was normal, then it would be easier for these companies to replace the ones that lost a work permit,” Levanon added. “Now, finding a qualified worker to replace is much more difficult.”

The months-long delays in renewing work permits has been “disruptive” for companies, said Jon Baselice, vice president of immigration policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, who has frequently heard from companies concerned about processing issues.

“It’s been quite disruptive,” he said. “You’re talking about a situation where a company can’t retain an employee at least in the short term because of lack of paperwork.”

For those employees, the wait for what’s otherwise routine paperwork means putting off plans and fretting over family finances.

Abelardo Rios, a telecommunications field technician residing in Florida, was suspended from his job last week. Rios, who’s seeking political asylum in the U.S., submitted his application for a renewal in February, three months before his work permit expired. He’s still waiting.

“We don’t have any benefits, no medical insurance. They put the position on hold, but my family doesn’t have benefits right now,” Rios told CNN in Spanish.

One of the most frustrating parts of the ordeal for Rios, who is the sole provider for his wife and 17-year-old daughter, is that he doesn’t have the option to find another job. He can’t work until his renewal request is granted, as it’s been many times before.

In recent weeks, the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project has received hundreds of inquiries from people who say their work permits have expired or are on the cusp of expiring, according to Leidy Perez-Davis, policy director at the Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project. They include doctors and specialists who attended to patients at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, engineers and long-haul truck drivers, among others.

The Asylum Seekers Advocacy Project, along with the American Immigration Council and Lakin & Wille LLP, filed a lawsuit this month challenging the “unreasonable delays” in renewing work authorizations for asylum seekers. Vera de Aponte is a named plaintiff in the ASAP lawsuit.

A work permit for an asylum seeker is usually valid for two years. Applicants can apply for renewal while their asylum application is pending. If they file before the permit expires, they can receive an automatic 180-day extension of their current permit. But processing, in some cases, is extending beyond that time frame, leaving asylum seekers in limbo.

USCIS, an agency within the Department of Homeland Security, has been facing enormous backlogs across the board due to the coronavirus pandemic and, an official argued, poor management under the previous administration that in part resulted in a million cases spanning categories that were unopened in January.

Since then, the Biden administration has been chipping away at the various backlogs at USCIS through policy changes, paying overtime, and trying to bring on more personnel, the official said. But while USCIS is trying to streamline operations to resolve for delays, it’s also doing so at a time when the agency is working to provide work permits to tens of thousands of Afghan evacuees, stressing already overwhelmed resources.

“We are very focused on the human consequences of people losing their ability to work when that’s something they have no legal reason why they shouldn’t be eligible, and so that’s why we are focused on fixing it,” the official said.

Heghine Muradyan, a doctor in California who attended to hundreds of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, lost her job in October when her work permit didn’t come in on time. It was approved this week, but she’s still waiting for the permit to get back to work. Muradyan, an asylum seeker who’s also a named plaintiff in the ASAP lawsuit, spent the last several weeks worried she’d lose her license to practice medicine if she didn’t return to work soon.

The uncertainty of what comes next still looms over others.

Biraj Nepal, a software engineer, gets a frequent warning from human resources that his work permit will expire in January, a reminder that he’s on the cusp of losing his job.

“We feel this country is our home,” said Nepal, who has a 4-year-old daughter and a baby on the way. “But we’re living in constant fear and worries because we don’t know what will happen to us tomorrow.”

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Cincinnati Reds Johnny Bench Sends a Message to Fiona on Her Birthday

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Fiona is celebrating her fifth birthday and everyone, including the Cincinnati Reds legend, Johnny Bench, the fifth catcher, is celebrating her birthday. Bench posed with a stuffed hippo and sent Fiona a special video message. Bench house stuffed animals. Represents the Cincinnati Zoo Fiona and all the wonderful animals. But Fiona is special. Happy birthday, Fiona. I also sent her birthday message, including her dad’s joke. “What do you call a hippo in a phone booth? I’m stuck.” Primitive scholar Jane Goodall sent Fiona a video message celebrating her fifth birthday. Goodall, a primatologist known around the world for his work on Cincinnati, congratulated Fiona on turning five. Zoo, here you are big and strong, “Goodall said in a video message. Fiona, who gave birth six weeks prematurely at the Cincinnati Zoo on January 24, 2017, weighs only 29 pounds at her birth and is 25 pounds less than her recorded minimum birth weight. She is her seed. She survived thanks to her tireless efforts to save her, encouraging many to take care of her species and wildlife.

Cincinnati —

Fiona is celebrating her fifth birthday and everyone, including the Cincinnati Reds legend, Johnny Bench, the fifth catcher, is celebrating her birthday.

Bench posed with a stuffed hippo and sent Fiona a special video message.

“This is one of our favorite plush toys at the bench house. It represents Fiona at the Cincinnati Zoo and all the wonderful animals. But Fiona is special. Happy Birthday, Fiona.”

The bench was one of the local legends wishing Fiona a happy birthday.

Drew Lachey also sent a birthday message, including his dad’s joke.

“What do you call a hippo at the phone booth? I’m stuck.”

Primatologist Jane Goodall sent Fiona a video message celebrating her fifth birthday.

Goodall, a primatologist known around the world for his research on chimpanzees, congratulated Fiona on turning five.

“I know you had a hard time getting into the world. Perhaps your mom did, but thanks to the people who took care of you at the zoo, you’re big and strong here.” Goodall said in her video message.

Fiona, who gave birth six weeks prematurely at the Cincinnati Zoo on January 24, 2017, weighed only 29 pounds at birth. This is 25 pounds less than the recorded minimum birth weight of her species. She survived thanks to her tireless efforts to save her, encouraging many to take care of her species and wildlife.

Cincinnati Reds Johnny Bench sends a message to Fiona on her birthday

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How to Determine If a KN95, N95 Mask Is a Counterfeit Product

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Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials have seized millions of counterfeit masks. Here’s how to find a fake:

As highly contagious Omicron variant of COVID-19 The surge continues in the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recently updated its guidance. Mask type Provides maximum protection to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

According to the CDC, proper respiratory organs, including N95, approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) provide the highest level of protection against COVID-19. Meanwhile, the Federal Public Health Service says that about 60% of KN95 masks sold in the United States in 2020 and 2021 did not meet NIOSH standards and were therefore flagged as counterfeit.In fact, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials Seized millions of counterfeit masks Since the start of the pandemic.Now many people online I’m wondering if there is a way to find a fake mask.

question

Is there a way to determine if the KN95 or N95 mask is counterfeit?

Source of information

answer

Yes, there is a way to determine if the KN95 or N95 mask is counterfeit.

What we found

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is a federal agency responsible for testing and approving masks and respiratory organs used in US workplaces.Before the mask is approved by NIOSH, it is the agency’s Respiratory approval programThis ensures that the mask and respiratory system meet the minimum structural, performance and respiratory protection standards.

NIOSH does not approve KN95 masks or other masks designed to comply with international standards. According to the CDC, the KN95 mask is manufactured in China and complies with the standards of the Chinese government.

Indicates that the N95 mask is NIOSH approved

NIOSH labels and numberes all masks it approves. Here’s how to find that information:

First, check the approval label on or inside the mask’s package, or look for the abbreviated approval of the mask itself. This certificate must include a number.

This approval number is NIOSH Certified Equipment List or NIOSH trusted source page..

NIOSH-approved masks always have one of the following:

N95
N99
N100
R95
R99
R100
P95
P99
P100

“If you have an unprinted N95, it’s probably not a real N95 and you’ll want to avoid using it,” said Nikki Vars McCullough, Global Technical Services and Regulatory Manager for Personal Safety. .. Mask maker 3M division.

Indicates that the N95 mask is forged

NIOSH lists how to detect if a mask may be forged On that website:

Filtering facepiece respirator has no markings
No Facepiece Respirator or Headband Filtering Approval (TC) Number
No NIOSH marking
NIOSH misspelled
Presence of decorative fabrics or other decorative add-ons (such as sequins)
Claims of Approval for Children (NIOSH does not approve any kind of respiratory protection for children)
The filter facepiece respirator has ear loops instead of a headband
The photo of the package is not clear

You can also look for alerts about specific products that are known to be fake.

If NIOSH becomes aware of a counterfeit mask or fake NIOSH approval, the agency will typically post a photo of the mask and its packaging online to warn users, buyers and manufacturers. click here Shows a list of the latest NIOSH counterfeit masks.

Show that your KN95 is genuine

ECRI, the largest patient safety organization in the United States, Announce research In September 2020, it was found that up to 70% of the nearly 200 KN95 masks tested did not meet NIOSH standards for efficacy, and many imported KN95 masks, as the name implies, accounted for 95% of aerosol particles. It turned out that it was not filtered. However, although ECRI’s vice president of technology and safety, Michael Argentieri, said that KN95 does not meet US regulatory standards, it “generally provides greater respiratory protection than surgical or cloth masks.” It states.

Kelly Carrosers, Director of Government Affairs Project N95, VERIFY Sister Station WTHR told There is one trick to make sure the KN95 is genuine.

“You need to look at the side of the mask, which should say GB2626-2019 or GB2626-2006,” Carothers said.

What to look for when shopping online

During the pandemic, many people used sites like Amazon to buy masks. question The authenticity of masks sold on the Amazon Marketplace. An Amazon spokesperson told VERIFY in a statement that the company had “a rigorous seller review and product review process to ensure compliance with applicable laws, regulations and Amazon policies.” rice field.

“Before listing N95 and KN95 masks in our store, we supply them from a trusted manufacturer by examining the supplier’s invoice, tracking inventory, checking packaging and product descriptions, and comparing with CDC’s counterfeit mask list. Make sure it is done, “said a spokeswoman.

Amazon customers can also contact the company’s customer support team to refund the full amount of their order if the product does not arrive or does not arrive as advertised.

According to NIOSH, there are a few things to keep in mind when buying masks online.

If you claim that your listing is “legitimate” and “genuine,” it may not be.
If the retailer or manufacturer claims that the KN95 mask is NIOSH approved
If possible, check transaction history and reviews
Will there be any changes to the items sold over time (high or low transaction period)?
Are there any price fluctuations or fluctuations? (Is it too good to be true?)
Look at the quantity the buyer has in stock
Does the seller violate the marketplace policy and hide contact information in the image?
Is your primary contact email address connected to your website or is it a free email account?
Look for bad grammar, typos, and other errors
Note the cookie cutter website where the seller exchanges some websites

How to report counterfeit masks

Before reporting a counterfeit mask to NIOSH, the agency will check the TC approval number (such as TC 84A-XXXX) to see if the identified mask is counterfeit or misrepresents NIOSH approval. It states that it needs to be done. NIOSH certified equipment List and verification Required approval marking.. next, False Respirator / NIOSH Approved Web Page Misrepresentation Check if the respiratory system is listed.

If the mask is not listed, you can send an email to PPEConcerns@cdc.gov More about the respirator. If possible, NIOSH is telling you to include a photo of the mask and its packaging in your submission. People can also report counterfeit COVID-19 products, including masks, to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by email. FDA-COVID-19-Scam-Products@fda.hhs.gov

Details of VERIFY: Yes, you can reuse the KN95 and N95 masks several times.Here’s how to do it right:

The Confirmation The team distinguishes between facts and fiction so that they can understand what is true and what is false.Consider our daily subscription Newsletter, Text alert And our youtube channel..You can follow us too Snapchat, twitter, Instagram, Facebook When Ticktaku.. learn more “

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How to determine if a KN95, N95 mask is a counterfeit product

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Road Recommendations After Snowy Weather

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LIMA —Sunday morning winter weather left slippery, snow-covered roads in counties in some areas. Several counties have declared Level 1 road recommendations.

Allen County Sheriff Matt Treglia declared Level 1 at 10:11 am. He warned that snow- and ice-covered roads could drift. Great care should be taken as operating conditions can be dangerous.

Auglaize County Sheriff Michael Vorhees issued Level 1 on snowy or ice-covered roads at 11:00 am.

Jeff Gray’s office, Sheriff of Mercer County, reported that several cars had slipped off the road, but did not make any recommendations.

Hancock County Sheriff Michael Heldman issued Level 1 at 9:55 am, focusing on dangerous roads.

A snowplow passes through the intersection of Force Street and Locust Street in Ottawa on Sunday morning.

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2022/01/web1_Snowplow.jpgA snowplow passes through the intersection of Force Street and Locust Street in Ottawa on Sunday morning.

Road recommendations after snowy weather

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